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The Norfolk Broads Forum / Broads Boat Owners Q & A / Paint & varnish strippers
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Posted By Discussion Topic: Paint & varnish strippers

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Paint & varnish strippers| Paint and varnish strippers| Tar Varnish| Tar Varnish| Black Tar Varnish?|

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Spider
Jun-08-2008 @ 11:58 AM                           Permalink
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I have two wooden racing dinghies the decks of which which need to be stripped back to bare wood. One is varnished, the other painted, and in neither case do I know precisely which product has been used. I'm sure that we are talking about a one rather than two pack system, and I suspect that the painted one is a polyurethane rather than yacht enamel, but beyond that I have no idea.

Can anyone advise on a good paint stripper for the job? We tried the heat-gun approach yesterday but it is painfully slow and I'd like to have them back on the water this year!!

Ariel_VH
Jun-08-2008 @ 12:03 PM                           Permalink
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I have used Nitromores in the past,very good if a bit messy....All D I Y stores sell it. Les.

Start the day with a smile and get it over and done with.

TheCommodore
Jun-08-2008 @ 12:43 AM                           Permalink
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Stick with the hot air gun and triangular scraper. If it's painfully slow you are doing it wrong. Leaves the surface clean and dry. Follow up with orbital sander and it's ready for recoating! I've stripped and primed a whole Mirror dinghy in an afternoon, top and bottom!

Geof


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BroadAmbition
Jun-09-2008 @ 5:47 AM                           Permalink
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Yep I'd go along with the Commodore on this one.

We stripped acres and acres of paint off 'B.A' and nowehere did we use paint stripper as far as I can remember (Oops, yes we did on a few small metal items) we always used the hot air guns with the triangles on both varnish and paint.  We did take to a proper gas blow torch removing the tar underneath however (that was messy and painful).

If you do ue paint stripper the 'Mess' gets inself into the grain and then it's a devil of a job to get it properly clean

Griff

'Broad Ambition' - 'Dreams do come true' - Afloat at last 06-10-07

Japonica
Jun-09-2008 @ 3:13 PM                           Permalink
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Hi Spider,
I've used 'Mangers' paint and varnish stripper and found it to be ok, unfortunately you must be patient (which I'm not) and not allow the stuff to dry out.
When I was doing some restoration work on a plywood Mirror dinghy the best thing I found for removing old varnish and paint was the good old skarston scraper. The boys at Martham showed me a long time ago how to sharpen the blades on this tool, and it can get through varnish and leave an almost perfect finish better than any other method I've tried.
cheers
Mat

Gordon
Nov-12-2008 @ 12:11 AM                           Permalink
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Forumites might be interested in these tools
http://www.permagrit.com/index.php?cPath=65&osCsid=6b3016f60b9a489a2eef335322099a0e
They last for ever and can be cleaned with paint stripper or wire brush, They come in a variety of shapes and are magic for rubbing down paint, shaping wood or rubbing down glass fibre of filler. The blocks have different grades of silicon carbide on each side.

Gordon

"There is nothing - absolutely nothing- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats" Ratty in Wind in the Willows

Misty
Nov-13-2008 @ 4:06 AM                           Permalink
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I have tried all methods and find the one that my father taught me some 50 years ago is the best, which is the metal scraper that I sharpen on an oil stone. It leaves a perfect finish especially on varnished surfaces. It is time consuming but as dad you to say "if a job is worth doing it is worth doing it well". He was a coach builder with London Transport when they were all built by hand.

Keith VK8VKS

billmaxted
Nov-13-2008 @ 9:00 AM                           Permalink
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Getting back to Spider’s original question. “I have two wooden racing dinghies the decks of which need to be stripped back to bare wood. One is varnished, the other painted”

I am presuming that we are talking about ply decks?  If so be very careful if scraping where there may be softness or any risk of delaminating because if you go through the surface layer you will end up with far more serious problems.  I’m just wondering if the painted one has been bodged in the past hence the paint.  There is some advantage in softening the finish before scraping.

Personally I like on anything other than polyurethane varnish, “Colron Restorer & Cleaner” which gently removes wax, shellac, lacquer & oil and traditional varnish.  Ideal if the surface has been waxed.  Tougher is their “Hard Finish remover” which will take off most things.  The two major problems are going to be discolouration of the wood and paint flecks in the grain.  Applying several coats of Deks No1 will not only help seal the surface reveal any figuring and lift paint in the grain, BUT, because the wood won’t swell again attention needs to be paid to any seams.  Sikkens ‘Centol Marine Varnish’ comes self-coloured, which can be useful in getting back to a consistent colour.  Overcoat this latter with ‘Seajet UV varnish’ for a more resistant finish.


Bill...(The Ancient Mardler)

Pandora-3
Nov-14-2008 @ 9:11 AM                           Permalink
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Here's an apparently good product (according to some posts on Wooden boat forum), although apparently caution should be used on ply because you might delaminate the top ply! Not caustic - small molecules penetrate and release oxygen.

http://www.paint-stripper.co.uk/removall_paint_stripper_product_info.htm#data

I'd like to use it on the antifoul on a carvel hull ,  but wonder if it would loosen the stopping.

Fell overboard? Let's just wait here, the tide will bring him back in.


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