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The Norfolk Broads Forum / Broads History / The origin of the broads
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Posted By Discussion Topic: The origin of the broads

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quackers
Dec-18-2016 @ 9:09 AM                           Permalink
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After more research, I have rewritten my previous web-site, and given it a new title: "The origin of the Norfolk Broads - a classic case of confirmation bias".

Anybody interested in this subject will find something more substantial than turkey to get their teeth into over the holiday period at www.broadsmaker.comwww.broadsmaker.com.

Certainly the broads are great big flooded peat pits, but the idea that it was not until the fourteenth century that they all became flooded is patently nonsense, and it is high time that the so-called authorities stopped perpetuating this myth.

Bill Saunders

theartist
Dec-18-2016 @ 9:43 AM                           Permalink
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seems all very feasable to me. small workings joined up.

Stingers
Dec-18-2016 @ 10:22 AM                           Permalink
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Bill:
Personally, I hadn't thought about the mechanics and logistics involved before now but I'd read only part of that page when I thought to myself that they must have dug the broads out in stages, leaving an old pit to flood while digging another adjacent pit. They could even have dug out some clay or whatever to line the intended walls to reduce seepage into the next year's intended pit. As you say, buy digging small pits anually, there's no need to bail out an area the size of Hicking Broad when a small amount of bailing to remove small amounts of seepage and rain water is all that is required. From obsevations, I believe that some modern sand & gravel pits are dug in a similar manner.

It all makes sense but, is there any evidence remaining of the barriers between adjacent pits anywhere on the broads? Perhaps it would be too much to expect any such remains after such a long period?

I'll read some more on this interesting subject over the next few weeks.

Andy

quackers
Dec-18-2016 @ 4:55 PM                           Permalink
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You will find my thoughts on your very pertinent question, Andy, if you click on to "The physical evidence" on the web-site.
Bill Saunders

Bill Saunders

simplesimon
Jan-01-2017 @ 6:11 PM                           Permalink
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Stingers wrote "It all makes sense but, is there any evidence remaining of the barriers between adjacent pits anywhere on the broads? Perhaps it would be too much to expect any such remains after such a long period?"


Yes. look at old aerial photos of Barton Broad where the remains of banks can clearly be seen. (In fact I suspect you can probably find them with soundings now where the BA haven't dredged)

Simon



This message was edited by simplesimon on Jan-1-17 @ 6:13 PM

quackers
Jan-02-2017 @ 6:28 AM                           Permalink
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SS, there was some visible evidence (e.g. on Barton Broad)of residual walls of peat running in parallel lines from one side of the basin to the other, dividing it up into very large sections, several acres in extent. They were probably left as property boundaries, and have all disappeared.

As stated on my website under "The physical evidence", there may be some trace of much smaller compartments at Strumpshaw and Hassingham, but the crude techniques used by the researchers in the 1940s and 50s were unlikely to have found such traces. More research is needed using modern techniques.

Bill Saunders


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